jtemplate.ru - free extensions for joomla

Nov 30, 2008: Advent Realizations - Fr. Satish

First Sunday of Advent

Readings for the First Sunday of Advent

This year I had invited people who would be alone for Thanksgiving for a meal. I must say we had a gala time. It was the preparation for the meal that took me by total surprise. Not long after I had announced about the meal, I was inundated by offers toward the meal mostly by parishioners, but also from other parishes. Every kind of dish and cash began to come in. There were so many offers that I had to refuse them. We still did end up with six pies for eleven people. Many times before and during the meal, I found myself moved deeply with the generosity, the honesty, the humility and the faith of this community. As I reflected back on this event I realize that this event reveals the character of the parish. This event tells us of the kind of people that we are. This event tells us about our faith in Christ. This event tells us how we live out that faith in our love for one another.

Read more...

Nov 23, 2008 - Thy Kingdom Come - Fr. Satish

The Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ the King

Today's Mass Readings

I heard a commentary this week about the Elks in Alaska and the grizzly bear. Of course when we talk about “bear” you know in some way I am also talking about the crisis in the stock market. The commentary was a comparison between how elks deal with the grizzly bear and how human begins deal with the stock market bear. Zoologists have studied the habits of elks and it reveals that when they feed in herds, a few of the elks have their head up looking out in all directions. The moment they sense danger they warn the rest and when most the elks stop grazing and look up towards the same direction, it means that a bear is hiding somewhere near. When they spot a bear, most of the elks begin to escape while a few of them try to stare the bear down and perhaps even try to scare it away. In this way, the other elks find more time to escape the grizzly bear. However, some of these bolder ones end up being themselves killed by the bear. The commentator on the radio said that if human beings could learn from the animal kingdom the stock market bear would not be as dangerous. On the contrary, all people have done these days is look out for themselves. Executives dumped their stocks in insider trading and made money while they could. Others sold their stocks even if they knew that it was going to be unprofitable to the others. In other words, each person is trying to save themselves not caring for what happens to the others. No one is willing to die for another.

Read more...

Nov 16, 2008 - Talents, Wealth & The Meaning of Life - Fr. Satish

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today's Mass Readings

Lynn McGarry was only 37 years old. She was married altogether for 12 years and had two kids; one is now in 8th grade and the other in 5nd grade. Lynn’s father was a Catholic and her mother, a Jew. Lynn herself received no formal training in any of these religions. However, after her marriage to Ed, she decided to join the RCIA. It was during this journey to become a Catholic that Lynn discovered that she had cancer. That was ten years back. I don’t know much about Lynn’s life prior to her cancer but since then, she was one heck of a Christian woman. She was known for this mysterious inner strength in her fight against the disease. In spite of her struggles, she was always more concerned about other people fighting cancer. The 2006 Relay for Life was held in her honour. Her desires were simple, like being there for her children’s first Holy Communion. She so badly wanted to be healed of her cancer, but when asked if she asked God “Why me?” she said “Why not me?” If people remember Lynn, they remember her only for her faith her goodness, and her inner strength. I celebrated her funeral mass and I ended the homily with the words, “Here lies a saint.” It is in the context of the Lynn’s life that I want to discuss the parable of the talents.

Read more...

Nov 9, 2008: The House of God - Fr. Satish

Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome

Today's Mass Readings

When most people think Vatican, they think St. Peter’s Basilica. We associate the papacy and the Church with "the greatest of all churches in the Christian world – St. Peter’s. Isn’t it strange then that today the church all over the world celebrates the dedication of the Basilica of St. John Lateran? Most Catholics think of St. Peter’s as the pope’s main church, but in reality, St. John Lateran is the pope’s cathedral. The Basilica of St. John Lateran is the Cathedral of the Diocese of Rome of which the Pope is the bishop. In it sits the official chair of the pope.

The history of this basilica is a testimony to the antiquity, the length, the breadth and the depth of the Catholic Church. The basilica is built over the ruins of a Roman fort established in 163 AD. When Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge he demolished the fort and the remaining palatial structure was occupied by the Laterani clan who served as the emperor’s administrators. The palace fell into Constantine’s hands when he married his second wife Fausta, the sister of Maxentius. Constantine donated the palace to the Bishop of Rome around 313 AD. It was extended and converted into the Cathedral of the Bishop of Rome. Pope Sylvester I dedicated the Basilica and the adjacent Lateran Palace in 324, declaring both to be Domus Dei or "House of God." Every pope from Miltiades occupied the Lateran Palace until the reign of the French Pope Clement V, who in 1309 decided to transfer the official seat of the Catholic Church to Avignon, France. During the Avignon papacy, the Lateran Palace and the basilica began to decline. It faced two destructive fires an earthquake and the ravages of war. The first basilica having been destroyed, it was rebuilt in the tenth century by Sergius III and consecrated by Benedict XIII in 1726. Today, this late baroque structure stands as a testimony to the enduring faith of Christians who live their Christian commitment as Catholics. It is indeed, as Pope Sylvester called it, the “House of God.”

Read more...

Nov 2, 2008: The Souls of the Just - Fr. Satish

The Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls)

Today's Mass Readings

I was talking to Kevin, our organist yesterday and he told me about his experience at this engineering company. It seems to him all that the owners of the company want is money. They do not have the patience for to wait for a product to reach from the design stage to the production stage. They want the product “now.” Not only that, their firing policy is the strangest I have come across. A lady comes up to call the person, talk to them as she walks them up to the door and says goodbye. Some of the employees have not even received their wages for the days they have worked. Recently, Kevin said, a seventy-three year coworker killed himself after he had had a stroke. The only thing the company was worried about was liability. The only motivation for the owners of this company is money. You may find it strange why I begin my homily for the commemoration of the faithful departed with this story. Because, I see in this story all the themes of today’s readings – except that the readings also give us the reason for hope.

Read more...