jtemplate.ru - free extensions for joomla

September 17, 2018 - Proclaim the Death of the Lord

Monday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

Today’s Responsorial Psalm uses a phrase from the first reading as its refrain: “Proclaim the death of the Lord until He comes again.” Sometimes as I reflect on my faith I wonder why death and suffering are such major focuses of our discipleship.  We are called to not only believe in Jesus and His death and resurrection,  but we are called to follow Him by our “dying” every day to be transformed or “resurrected.”   Although it seems difficult to understand ( and very challenging to live), Jesus shows us how the only way we can become who God calls us to be is to recognize that dying is an essential part to our salvation.  It is our faith in Jesus and His death that allows us to proclaim this great mystery of transformation and hope.

Read more...

September 16, 2018 - Faith Leads to Action & Action Originates in Faith

Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

“Not my family, not my problem!” On the 26thof September, I am organizing an evening to share my experience with undocumented immigrants at El Paso and Juarez. I posted the information and flyer on my Facebook page. One of the actual responses on my post from someone who identified himself as a Christian was, “Not my family, not my problem!” For all the years I have been on social media, this was my first jaw-dropping, shocking moment. Immaterial of the issue, I cannot believe that a Christian could think this way. What use is faith, if it does not lead to action? What use is action if it does not originate in faith? 

Read more...

September 15, 2018 - Courageous Mary

Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows

Scripture Readings

Over a decade ago, I lived in Scranton, Pennsylvania. On every Good Friday, the bishop would give the homily at the cathedral. He would always begin by saying (in a rather severe tone), “Today is the saddest day of the year.” There was something about that line that never sat well with me. I grew up praying the rosary—including the Sorrowful mysteries—as well as the Stations of the Cross and I never thought that I should be miserable doing so. I was, after all, praying with the Church, which exists precisely because of Christ’s resurrection. These prayers and liturgical actions only make sense in the context of the entire story of Jesus—we enter into His death knowing that He is risen! We die with Him, knowing that we too will rise with Him.

Read more...

September 14, 2018 - Look at Me

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Scripture Readings

It is striking how, in today’s first reading, the people are made well after simply looking at the bronze serpent.  Why would simply looking at a sculpture be recorded in our salvation history as the way the people were saved from the wrath of the snakes’ bites?  In the Israelite camp, there were thousands and thousands of people, and there was only 1 bronze snake.  So, to see it, the people would need to seek it out.  The pilgrimage to go and see the snake was a sign of belief, the opposite of their unbelief that caused the snake problem in the first place.  It’s a pretty low-key miracle compared to the quail, water from the rock, walls of water, and ten plagues that the people saw earlier.  God was helping the people understand that they need a two way relationship with God; they need to seek the Lord to be saved.

Read more...

September 13, 2018 - Helping Others...Even When They're "Wrong"

Thursday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time

Scripture Readings

We live in an intellectual society, with an unprecedented amount of knowledge at our fingertips, thanks to the Internet.  It can seem easy to do a few minutes of searching on know a fair amount about any given subject.  We like that feeling of being right, of ‘knowing.’  As the first reading says, it ‘inflates with pride.’ Catholics are just as attracted to this as anyone, but we have another source of knowledge that is very different; our conscience.  The problem is, we all have one, and they don’t always agree, even when they are “well-formed.”  So what do we do about these disagreements?  Our readings today help answer this question.

Read more...